Longstone

Extract from Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England, 1831.
Transcribed by Mel Lockie, © Copyright 2010
Lewis Topographical Dictionaries

LONGSTONE (GREAT), a chapelry in the parish of BAKEWELL, hundred of HIGH-PEAK, county of DERBY, 3 miles (N.N.W.) from Bakewell, containing, with Holme, 442 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield, and in the patronage of the Vicar of Bakewell. The chapel, which is dedicated to St. Giles, contains several monuments belonging to the family of Eyres, Earls of Newburgh. The chapelry is in the honour of Tutbury, duchy of Lancaster, and within the jurisdiction of a court of pleas held at Tutbury every third Tuesday, for the recovery of debts under 40s.

The commissioners for enclosing lands granted to trustees an allotment of waste land of about fourteen acres, for the support of a schoolmaster, which lets for £9. 13. per annum; this sum, with £5 per annum, the bequest of William Wright in 1656, and an annual contribution of £5 from the Duke of Devonshire, is paid to the master for teaching twenty-five poor children gratuitously; the school-room was built by subscription, and there is a house and garden for the master.

LONGSTONE (LITTLE), a hamlet in the parish of BAKEWELL, hundred of HIGH-PEAK, county of DERBY, 3½ miles (N.W. by N.) from Bakewell, containing 145 inhabitants.

HOLME, a township in the parish of BAKEWELL, hundred of HIGH-PEAK, county of DERBY, 1 mile (N.) from Bakewell. The population is returned with the chapelry of Great Longstone.

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