Chitterne (All Saints & St Mary)

Extract from Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England, 1831.
Transcribed by Mel Lockie, © Copyright 2010
Lewis Topographical Dictionaries

CHILTERN (ALL-SAINTS), a parish in the hundred of HEYTESBURY, county of WILTS, 4 miles (E.N.E.) from Heytesbury, containing 381 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, to which is united the vicarage of Chiltern St. Mary, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury, rated in the king's books at £7. 0. 10., and in the patronage of the Bishop and the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury alternately. Chiltern lies adjacent to the Chiltern downs, a chain of chalk hills which, from the nature of the soil, was called by the Saxons Gilt, or Chilt. They were anciently covered with impenetrable woods, infested by robbers, until Leofstan, abbot of St. Albans, thinned them, and the Danes burnt them down in 1009. By accepting the nominal stewardship of this district under the crown, a member of parliament is enabled to vacate his seat. Westward from this place is a small Roman camp, named Knooke Castle; and near it an irregular ditch running in various directions, as if intended to form some ancient boundary-line.

CHILTERN (ST-MARY), a parish in the hundred of HEYTESBURY, county of WILTS, 3 miles (E. by N.) from Heytesbury, containing 169 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to that of Chiltern All Saints, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury, rated in the king's books at £6.

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