Sherston

Extract from Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England, 1831.
Transcribed by Mel Lockie, © Copyright 2010
Lewis Topographical Dictionaries

SHERSTON (MAGNA), a parish in a detached portion of the hundred of CHIPPENHAM, county of WILTS, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Malmesbury, containing 1146 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the rectory of Sherston Parva united, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury, rated in the king's books at £10. 2., endowed with £1000 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester. The church, dedicated to the Holy Cross, exhibits portions of Norman and of the several styles of English architecture: it is a large structure, with a lofty tower rising from the centre. Mrs. Hodges, in 1726, bequeathed a rent-charge of £5 for teaching poor children; besides which there are a trifling sum, the gift of Thomas Byrton, in 1721, and £200 left by Ann Brain, in 1780, for the like purpose. Two small streams, forming the river Avon, unite in this parish. Sherston, from its situation near the Consular way, and from the coins of Antoninus, Faustinus, Gordianus, Flavius, Julianus, and others found here, was evidently occupied by the Romans. In the neighbourhood are the foundations and fragments of three stone crosses; and here was fought, in 1016, an obstinate battle between Edmund Ironside and Canute the Great.

SHERSTON, or SHERSTON-PINKNEY (PARVA), a parish, in a detached portion of the hundred of CHIPPENHAM, county of WILTS, 4 miles (W.) from Malmesbury, containing 123 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, united to the vicarage of Sherston Magna, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury, rated in the king's books at £3. 14. 4. The church has long been demolished, no institution having taken place since 1640, when the patronage was in the Crown.

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